Well I am 5.5 weeks post surgery and I continue to take baby steps forward. I have been going to the pool almost daily, doing some water running, easy swimming (although I have a sore shoulder that keeps me from doing too much), floating in the lazy river & enjoying the steam room. I am becoming friends with the Canmore senior citizen crew there. The last two days I have been out of the air cast/boot and have been doing some easy spins on the exercise bike, I actually cracked a sweat bead today, my first outside the steam room in a month and a half. It felt damn good. I have also started a basic physio program to start increasing my range of motion and rebuilding some of my severely atrophied muscles. I haven't set any timelines on recovery, not wanting to put that pressure on myself, rather I'm focusing on rebuilding my body, trying to avoid/minimize any long term setbacks and learn proper movement patterns again. As with any recovery, some days are better and easier than others. I continue to not fully understand or recognize my body. I still have some numbness/tingling in my legs from nerve impingement due to swelling in my hips and back and, until recently, I was suffering from rather debilitating positional vertigo, but that seems to have passed. I'm still home from work because of my discomfort and really appreciate the incredible support that I've received from my colleagues there. I still can't drive, or sit in one position for too long without getting uncomfortable (but I guess I was like that before my accident too), but overall, my healing is moving in the right direction. I continue to be incredibly thankful for the support of my mom who has been living with me (she leaves on Friday), my girlfriend Laura who has been my rock, my brother and dad for their undying love across the continents, as well as my friends who keep me grounded and laughing. I have been reading books like a fiend and appreciate everyone who has made recommendations and who has sent me reading material, I've also been fly fishing from the shore to enjoy time outside, as well as drawing and writing to give myself a mental outlet. Thank you all for the continued support!

A photo posted by Adam Campbell (@adamo1979) on

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Canadian trail and mountain runner Adam Campbell continues his recovery following a serious fall in the Selkirk Mountains as he and two friends were climbing near British Columbia’s Rogers Pass. Campbell is almost six weeks post-surgery after, among other injuries, breaking his pelvis and spine T8-T11 as well as suffering severe lacerations.

He is now back in Canmore, Alta. following an extended stay in Kamloops, B.C. where he was in the hospital.

“Well I am 5.5 weeks post surgery and I continue to take baby steps forward,” Campbell wrote on social media on Oct. 5. “I have been going to the pool almost daily, doing some water running, easy swimming (although I have a sore shoulder that keeps me from doing too much), floating in the lazy river and enjoying the steam room. I am becoming friends with the Canmore senior citizen crew there.”

RELATED: See the FULL recap of Campbell’s accident, including his insight on the events here.

The endurance athlete and lawyer was climbing with friends Dakota Jones and Nick Elson on Aug. 30 when he fell in the mountain pass when a rock gave out. Jones and Elson rushed down to Campbell and contacted search and rescue before Campbell was transported to Kamloops and Royal Inland Hospital for surgery.

“The last two days I have been out of the air cast/boot and have been doing some easy spins on the exercise bike, I actually cracked a sweat bead today, my first outside the steam room in a month and a half,” Campbell continues in his update. “It felt damn good. I have also started a basic physio program to start increasing my range of motion and rebuilding some of my severely atrophied muscles. I haven’t set any timelines on recovery, not wanting to put that pressure on myself, rather I’m focusing on rebuilding my body, trying to avoid/minimize any long term setbacks and learn proper movement patterns again.”

RELATED: VIDEO: Kilian Jornet, back from Everest, goes for a run on a “normal-sized” mountain.

Campbell adds that although he cannot sit in a single position for an extended period of time, his healing is “moving in the right direction.” He has been fly fishing, drawing and reading to give himself a “mental outlet,” as he continues to relearn certain movements in the recovery process.

Campbell’s update

Throughout the recovery, Campbell has noted how important the running community and his family and friends have been in terms of support. He adds that he “can’t wait to get back out and enjoy some time on the trails and slopes with you all.”


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