A cool US$1 million courtesy of Adidas is up for grabs as an incentive to any athlete who breaks the National Football League combine (physical evaluation for rookies) 40-yard dash record, the sportswear giant announced this week.

Football player Chris Johnson, who on multiple occasions has stated that he could make the U.S. team in track and field, holds the record, set in 2008, running 4.24.

The only requirement for the record is that the 40-yard record must be accomplished using 2016 adizero 5-Star 40 cleats, a line of shoes offered by Adidas.

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“It’s a good incentive, especially for college kids who grind their whole college careers and now have an opportunity to benefit from it,” said Tevaughn Campbell, a two-sport athlete with the University of Regina Cougars and the Saskatchewan Roughriders.

Campbell is a defensive back with the Roughriders, a team in the Canadian Football League (CFL), and competes for the university as a track and field athlete in the winter. He broke the all-time 40-yard electronic record at the CFL combine in 2015 running 4.355.

“Unfortunately I am not eligible to compete at the NFL combine but if I was I’d be there trying to cash-in,” added the Toronto native. “The timing would have been great if a similar offer was put out last year.”

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Campbell won the men’s 60m dash at the Bison Classic in Winnipeg last weekend representing the Regina Cougars track and field team. He was traded to the Roughriders, his new team, from the Calgary Stampeders just yesterday — the Canadian Football League season is expected to begin in June.

Football and track and field athletes have been compared extensively in the past and it’s speculated that Usain Bolt, the 100m and 200m world record holder, would run just under four seconds for the 40-yard dash according to some estimates.

The NFL 40-yard dash is run on turf, and includes no reaction time since the clock starts only when an athlete starts and does not coincide with the sound of a starter’s pistol.


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