We asked some of the country’s top runners and race organizers about their best lessons from 2013 and their plans for 2014.

Rob Watson

Rob-Watson

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What did you learn in 2013 that you want to apply to your training in 2014?

The importance of non-running things that need to be done to help recovery and maintain health. I would say these things are of equal importance to the actual running I do. I spend a whole lot of time focusing on recovering properly, maintaining health and being proactive with injury prevention.

What was a great moment that you will remember about 2013?

Leading Boston through the scream tunnel at Wellesley. They said it would be loud, but holy moly man, it was absurd! I couldn’t even hear myself think. Sure, I blew the hell up during that race, only finished 11th, but my little stretch there as the leader was the most fun I have ever had in a race.

What goals do you have for 2014?

62:29 and 2:10:59

Two resolutions: one running resolution and a non-running one?

I need to learn to become less of a slave to numbers and distance during workouts. I’ve got to be able to trust the body and just let the pace happen.

I also need to build the courage to ask that cute barista on a date. I seriously lack skills in that department, but man, she is cute! I can do it! I probably won’t do it.

Alan Brookes

Photo: Canada Running Series

Photo: Canada Running Series

What did you learn in 2013 that you want to apply to your training in 2014?

Consistency, consistency, consistency.

What was a great moment that you will remember about 2013?

Three of them:
1. Greatest moment was being at the Scotiabank Toronto Waterfront finish line with Lanni Marchant, Krista DuChene and Sylvia Ruegger.
2. Being close to the finish line at Boston 2013.
3. Going past Yorkminster Park Baptist Church at Yonge and Deslisle six days later in the lead vehicle for Toronto Yonge Street 10K and hearing them ringing the bells for our runners. Very moving.
Boston brought us together and reinforced how much the running community is a community, and an important part of cities, city-life and city-building.

What goals do you have for 2014?

Let’s take down Drayton’s record at the Scotiabank Toronto Waterfront Marathon! Other than that, to work hard with our great Canada Running Series team to continue to deliver well-organized, international-quality, innovative races for everyone, right here in Canada
half-marathon women's running

Krista DuChene wins the 2013 Scotiabank Vancouver Half-Marathon. Photo: Inge Johnson

Krista DuChene

What did you learn in 2013 that you want to apply to your training in 2014?

Same as every other year; gradual increase in volume and intensity brings results.

What was a great moment that you will remember about 2013?

Becoming Canada’s top two fastest marathoners with Lanni Marchant at the Scotiabank Toronto Waterfront Marathon.

What goals do you have for 2014?

A PB in the 10K and 10,000m.

Two resolutions: one running resolution and a non-running one?

Expand my strength, core and stretching/rolling routine and train my kids to make their beds routinely!
Author enjoying the endless bog. Photo courtesy of Lost World Series.

Noel Paine Photo courtesy of Lost World Series.

Noel Paine

What did you learn in 2013 that you want to apply to your training in 2014?

Great moments for me in 2013 included running across the Grand Canyon solo in March, followed by a 100K trail race in Tuscany in April, but like in years past my most memorable moments included meeting and talking with all the great Canadian runners I profile each week.

What goals do you have for 2014?

In 2014 I will be teaming up with Canadian Running and Canada’s top two marathoners, Eric Gillis and Reid Coolsaet, to try and run a lifetime PB at the Ottawa marathon. I will getting guidance, training hard and sharing my struggles, oreo binges and insights on how to train right with readers. These new blog pieces and updates will be intermingled with stories of Canadian runners I continue to find.

Two resolutions: one running resolution and a non-running one?

My two resolutions for 2014 are to get back into training for a lifetime marathon PB after a short break to sell a house and eating too much over Christmas, and number two is to eat more vegetables.

Stacy Chesnutt

Photo Courtesy: Stacy Chesnutt

Stacy Chesnutt

What did you learn in 2013 that you want to apply to your training in 2014?

I learned that I am not invincible! Sheer willpower is not going to be enough anymore. I will need to be smart and strategic in my race choices! I can’t do everything I want without a cost. This is a lesson that I am late in learning as I enter my 28th year of running and my third year as a masters runner.

What was a great moment that you will remember about 2013?

Winning the Valley Harvest Ultra Marathon 50K with a race strategy that included walking all the hills. Walking allowed me to win? I have done three ultras and this was the most fun and fastest one I did.  I was shocked to learn that walking gave me just enough recovery to run hard when I was actually running. Winning here was particularly special because this has always been one of my favorite races in Nova Scotia.

What goals do you have for 2014?

I have always found the longer the race, the better I do, but I want to challenge myself in 2014 in a way I haven’t done before.  So, after the Boston Marathon I plan to focus on the 5K and 10K distances to see how fast I can get.

Two resolutions: one running resolution and a non-running one?

My most immediate resolution is to find my speed. I will know I have found it when I break 1:9:00 in the 5K and 39:00 in the 10K.

My non-running goal is to double the size of Girls Gone Gazelle running club,a free all-girls running club for girls eight to thirteen.  I am the founder and head coach for this amazing group of young girls and we have coached 100 girls in two years, but I want coach 100 girls in 2014 alone!

 


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