Nothing stays the same. This truth has been revealing itself to me since I started writing this blog almost three years ago. As runners and as human beings, we’re always evolving. Our splits get faster, while our lives move along at just as rapid a pace.

The idea of change is on my mind this week because it’s the last time I’m working with Canadian Running’s web editor: Sinead Mulhern. She’s moving on at the end of the month – as we all eventually do – because, well, nothing stays the same.

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In my ever-changing story, there’s both certainty and uncertainty. One thing I know for certain is that I love to run. What I’ve learned though is that surrounding all of that certainty are a whole lot of unknowns. I don’t consider this to be a negative thing – it’s simply the reality. When I started on this running journey, I was naive in thinking that I would take a straight line towards my goals – I couldn’t have been more wrong.

The countless variables that play into this sport have put me on an emotional roller coaster more times than I can count. Fortunately, over the years, I’ve learned to step off that roller coaster and take a look at the bigger picture. I’ve learned not to panic when a training block doesn’t go as planned, or when an injury rears its head (again). I’ve learned that uncertainty is simply part of chasing after something difficult. I’m testing my limits to see what I’m capable of, and I have no idea how it’s going to play out. It may sound daunting, but this is not only a part of the beauty of this sport, but it’s also part of any journey in which we make ourselves vulnerable by pursuing our passions.

There are moments when I find myself frustrated and wanting answers, but never do I wish to know how the journey ends. I love the mystery of it. I’m driven by this curiosity. In order to live joyfully, I’ve learned it’s necessary to let go of those things I can’t control. In doing so, I’ve allowed myself to embrace the process and not be too impacted by the highs and lows of the sport.

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I had a mantra that I used when I was playing hockey in college that has popped back into my life as a runner. It’s simple, but true: “All I can do, is the best I can do.” Whether it’s a routine morning run, a workout, or a rest day, I’m committed to doing my best. Anything outside of this isn’t within my control.

So, while nothing stays the same, I find peace in the pursuit of what I love, and its consistent presence in my life. My journey as a runner will forever be evolving and the mystery forever unfolding. I’m in this for the long haul, so it’s up to me to embrace whatever changes come my way and graciously march on.

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