If you’re a serious runner who’s training and racing multiple times a year, you probably have several different pairs of shoes. Different shoes serve different purposes, and while it may seem thrifty to have one multi-purpose shoe, it makes sense to have different shoes for different parts of your training.

Besides being able to replace them less frequently, switching up what’s on your feet also gives you some protection against injury. Here are several excellent shoes by Saucony to take you through your next marathon or half-marathon training cycle. Naturally there will be some overlap, but basically you want a shoe for your long weekly training runs, a shoe for speedwork, and a shoe for midweek easy and tempo runs (which will likely double as your race shoe).

Saucony Ride ISO2. Photo: Matt Stetson

All models have a highly breathable mesh upper, and all feature Saucony’s classic EVERUN topsole construction for enhanced energy return and solid cushioning. The more cushioned models feature a combination of EVERUN and PWRFOAM cushioning material. Click the links for a full review of each shoe.

RELATED: REVIEW: Saucony Ride ISO2

Ride ISO2–for long runs and tempo runs

Saucony Ride ISO2. Photo: Matt Stetson

Shoe category: Neutral cushioning
Drop: 8 mm
Price: $159.99 CAD
Cushion: Responsive
Weight: 249 grams
Surfaces tested: Road, track

Buy men’s Buy women’s

 

The Ride ISO2 is a generously-cushioned yet highly responsive trainer that’s most appropriate for your long runs and tempo runs, since it’s cushiony enough to keep you comfortable over the long haul while also providing great energy return when you’re looking for responsiveness (and results). It’s also a great option for the actual race.

RELATED: REVIEW: Saucony Guide ISO 2

Guide ISO2

Saucony Guide ISO2. Photo: Matt Stetson

Shoe category: Stability cushioning
Surfaces tested: Road, trail
MSRP: $169.99 CAD
Weight: Women’s size 8: 9.0 oz. (255 g), Men’s size 9: 10.3 oz (292 g)
Offset: 8 mm

Buy men’s Buy women’s

 

The Guide ISO2 is the stability version of the Ride ISO2 for the runner with overpronation issues, or whose form has a tendency to break down towards the end of a long race. It’s a highly cushioned shoe with a little more posting where you need it, to correct those mild issues that many runners have with overpronation, especially after a couple of hours on your feet. The Guide ISO2 will help keep you comfortably cushioned while preventing fatigue from breaking down your form during those crucial later stages.

RELATED: SHOE REVIEW: Saucony Kinvara 10

Kinvara 10

Saucony Kinvara 10. Photo: Matt Stetson

Shoe category: Neutral cushioning
Drop: 4 mm
Price: $110.00
Cushion: Responsive
Weight: 190 grams
Surfaces tested: Road, track, trail

The Kinvara 10 has long been a favourite of the serious racer. It’s most appropriate for shorter runs, speedwork and tuneup races, where you’re focussed on performance above all. Considerably lighter than the Ride ISO2, the Kinvara also has less of an offset between toe and heel, which will get you up on your midfoot and producing great results in intervals, fartleks and short tempo runs. The performance-contoured footbed makes it highly comfortable and keeps your foot secure for the entire run.

RELATED: For exceptional comfort and cushioning, the Saucony Triumph ISO 5 delivers

Triumph ISO5

Saucony Triumph ISO5. Photo: Matt Stetson

Shoe Category: Neutral cushioning
Cushion: Plush
Surfaces tested: Road
Offset: 8mm (28mm heel – 20mm forefoot)
Weight: 11.4 oz/323 g (Men’s 9); 10 oz/284g (Women’s 8)
MSRP: $195 CDN

Buy men’s Buy women’s

 

The Triumph ISO5 is the most luxurious of the lot, providing ample cushioning for your longest runs, and with the same 8 mm offset as the Ride ISO2 and the Guide ISO2. It’s also the heaviest, meaning you might prefer to save it for your really long training runs when you’re more focused on comfort so you can maximize the benefit of your time on the road, and less intent on performance. And the crystal rubber outsole means it will stand up to hundreds of kilometres of wear.

 

 

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