Tedy Bruschi, 46, the former linebacker for the New England Patriots who ran the Boston Marathon in 2012, 2014 and 2019, suffered a mild stroke last Thursday, July 4, and is recovering well at a Massachusetts hospital near his home, southwest of Boston.

Bruschi is a three-time Superbowl winner who retired from pro football in 2009. His  number was 54, and when he ran Boston this year, he wore the number 5454. His time was 4:35.

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The B.A.A. issued the following statement: “The B.A.A.’s thoughts are with Tedy, the entire Bruschi family, and our friends at Tedy’s Team. For years, Tedy has been an outspoken advocate for stroke awareness, and has used his participation in the Boston Marathon to spread the message of stroke education. We wish him a very speedy recovery.”

 

Tedy Bruschi with cheque for his charity, Tedy’s Team, at Boston Marathon 2019. Photo: Boston Athletic Association

This was not Bruschi’s first stroke. His first occurred in February 2005, just a few weeks after winning his third Superbowl. After several months’ rehabilitation he was cleared to play in October of that year. It was discovered that he suffers from a heart anomaly called a patent foramen ovale, which is a small opening between the heart’s left and right atria that normally closes after a baby’s birth, but when it doesn’t, it may lead to low oxygen levels in the arterial blood that supplies the brain, organs and tissues. This increases the risk of stroke in those affected.

Bruschi created Tedy’s Team after his first stroke, to raise awareness and funds for the condition. The team participates in the Boston Marathon and the Falmouth Road Race, among others. Bruschi also created the the Talk & Walk with Tedy Bruschi series with the B.A.A., where he speaks to members of the community about healthy habits and stroke awareness. And he hosted the panel of defending champions at this year’s Boston Marathon Fan Fest.

Tedy Bruschi with Des Linden at Boston Marathon Fan Fest 2019. Photo: Boston Athletic Association

Bruschi has been an analyst for ESPN since his retirement in 2008.

 

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