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The ultimate group run faux pas

The seven unwritten rules of the group run

As with any sport, there’s a certain etiquette that runners are expected to follow during a group practice. Some of these social norms are obvious, and others are a little more obscure and learned as people get to know their training partners. If you’re an avid group runner, or belong to a team, below are seven things that have certainly frustrated you before (and a few you might be guilty of yourself).

RELATED: The new user’s guide to Strava etiquette

Constant bathroom breaks

Runners: you get one bathroom break per run. That’s reasonable. Multiple bathroom stops over the course of a 75 minute run is too much stoppage.

Shoes that are always coming undone

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Shoelaces come undone sometimes, but like bathroom stops, you get one shoelace break. If your laces are coming undone more than once per run, you need to go to triple-knotting (or velcro).

Consistent tardiness

Life happens, so sometimes people are running late and that’s entirely normal. However, chronic tardiness is a pain for your training partners. If you’re meeting for a Saturday morning run, it’s unlikely that this was the only thing on everyone’s calendar. Try your best to be on time (setting your alarm five minutes earlier makes a big difference).

Pace-pushing

This is also called two-stepping. No one likes a two-stepper, or a pace-pusher. Run the pace your group agreed on, especially if it’s a recovery day.

The sub-category of the two-stepper is the GPS-arguer. Not everyone’s GPS is going to get the exact same distance and pace for the run, and that’s alright.

All the excuses

There are days when everyone feels a little rough. Instead of making excuses, just ask your group to slow down a little bit. Odds are they won’t mind at all, and it’ll make everyone’s run a little better.

Better yet, if you’re really feeling rough, maybe make it a cross-training day or a solo run so you’ll stick to a pace that makes sense for you.

Changing the route

If your group decide on a route ahead of time, don’t be the person who always needs to change it. Just go with the flow.

Listening to music

If you’re opting to run with a bunch of people, why are you also opting to use headphones? Make a new friend, ask someone about their life, leave the beats at home.